Addendum: A Game of Thrones and Wikipedia Wars

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You all might recall that I responded to the New York Times review of A Game of Thrones by Ginia Bellafante about two weeks ago.  At the bottom of that post, I had a screencap of her Wikipedia page, which had, at the time, been edited in response to her review.  For fun, I decided to compile all the most amusing sentences and changes since the 15th of April.

As of April 15, 2011 (22:08 PM)(it was promptly removed):

Often shows a skewed and limited perception of women.

As of April 15, 2011 (22:24 PM)(also promptly removed):

And loves bashing the fantasy genre and has a skewed outlook on life.

As of April 15, 2011 (22:40 PM)(again, removed — let’s just assume everything is eventually removed at this point):

She is a bad critic.

As of April 16, 2011 (7:11 AM):

Ginia Bellafante (born March 31, 1965) is an ill-informed and bizarrely sexist American writer and critic, for the New York Times,[1] New York Observer,[2] and Time (magazine).

As of April 16, 2011 (21:27 PM):

Ginia Bellafante (born March 31, 1965) is an American writer and critic, for the New York Times, also weirdly anti-feminist[1] New York Observer,[2] and Time (magazine).

As of April 17, 2011 (5:33 AM):

She is also weirdly anti-feminist and believes that the interests of women can be put into boxes.

As of April 17, 2011 (16:03 PM):

Her 2011 review of the Game of Thrones TV series was widely criticized as sexist for suggesting that only sexual content might motivate women to watch a complex fantasy story.

As of April 18, 2011 (20:03 PM):

Bellafante’s writing has been criticized for its superficial treatment of gender issues: Salon.com critiqued a 1998 Time cover story on feminism by Bellafante as “poorly thought-out”, and her 2011 New York Times review of the TV series Game of Thrones was widely criticized as sexist for suggesting that only sexual content might motivate women to watch a complex fantasy story.

As of April 18, 2011 (20:12 PM):

Bellafante’s writing has been criticized for its superficial treatment of gender issues: Bellafante’s 1998 Time cover story “Is Feminism Dead?” was critiqued by Erica Jong[4] and described by Salon.com as “poorly thought-out”, and Bellafante’s 2011 New York Times review of the TV series Game of Thrones was widely criticized as sexist for suggesting that only sexual content might motivate women to watch a complex fantasy story.

As of April 25, 2011 (7:29 AM):

Her writing has been criticized for its superficial treatment of gender issues: Her 1998 Time cover story “Is Feminism Dead?” was critiqued by Erica Jong[4] and described by Salon.com as “poorly thought-out”, and her 2011 New York Times review of the TV series Game of Thrones was widely criticized as sexist for suggesting that only sexual content might motivate women to watch a complex fantasy story.

And there you go.  Interesting how these things develop, no?

About the Author:

Shaun Duke is an aspiring writer, a reviewer, and an academic. He is currently a graduate student at the University of Florida studying science fiction, postcolonialism, posthumanism, and fantasy.

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